Siberian Iris

Around 2002 or 2003, I bought a pot of Siberian Iris, sometimes called Japanese Iris. These perennials bloom each May on graceful stems. Unlike their bearded counterparts, they do not multiply via rhizomes, but through seeds produced in late summer and early fall. Their leaves are upright, soft and graceful, again not at all like the bearded Iris which have firm, blade-like leaves. My single purchase has produced countless of babies. We enjoy many clumps of this deep purple-blue color, which is my primary garden color. I am always looking for blues and violet blues! I have shared many of these with my garden friends!

Siberian Iris
Graceful Siberian Iris

I keep finding more to plant! I have tried other plants along this walkway, but the Siberian Iris, though the blooms are short-lived,provide pretty upright foliage all year long.

You can see the foliage better here. Aren’t they graceful looking?  Siberian Irises transplant well. They produce upright, rigid seed heads and self seed readily. The seed heads could be very pretty in arrangements, if painted with a floral paint. The blooms only last a week, but one clump can produce many blooms!

Siberian Iris

De-flowered Clematis

I love the way flowers look just before they bloom and slightly after their peak. When I lived in northern Delaware, I tried to grow clematis, but never had any luck. In southern Delaware, I was more successful and I try and buy a new variety each year. Two, along our eastern fence, pour their blooming attention to our neighbor’s house, so we just get to see the back end of them unless we crank our necks! I’ve wised up and started planting them on a southern exposure of our fence. This variety was a purple/blue color, which I love. It had some blooms in the store, and the first of these first petals just fell off, exposing the stamens and interior of the clematis. I think it looks awful pretty, even without the petals!

Clematis no petals